Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Eden Forest

Eden Forest is a fully interactive Augmented Reality project using Aurasma.  The print is composited from photographs and gesture drawings in in the Hudson Valley, alongside a small muddy stream. 

Use the QR code to download and preview the Augmented Reality.  The work reveals the forest, the organic miscroscopic life, and excerpts from the video "Eden Waters" with music by Bob Gluck (vocals by Zoe Zak)

In this small version only the forest may be visible - come to an exhibition to see the 54" version with multiple layers of interactivity!(or - if you have a large screen you may be able to see more by moving in a bit closer)




Thursday, March 6, 2014

Plankton image with embedded AR


Plankton in the Hudson Valley with embedded AR using Aurasma
Follow cbrbuin on Aurasma to view content


Saturday, September 28, 2013

Eden Waters AR (Augmented Reality)


Videos, Photographs, and Sounds are hidden within Eden Waters
To view the Augmented Reality in the image above
  1. download the Aurasma app for your smart phone or tablet
    Google Play
    itunes


  2. Scan the QR code

  3. Make Eden Waters image  full screen
     
  4. Point to Eden Waters image on your screen!
go to http://www.aurasma.com for link to download for your phone or tablet 

This image is extracted from the video in progress:
http://planktonportraiture.blogspot.com/2013/09/eden-waters-hudson-valley-fresh-water.html


an example of what you will see with Aurasma


And more examples below





Eden Waters: Hudson Valley Fresh Water


https://vimeo.com/66880980

Eden Waters

Imagine life as a microscopic aquatic creature in the season of beginnings. Eden Waters is digitally composited from manipulated video captures of life in fresh water taken from a muddy stream in the Hudson Valley, in June, 2013, just as the ground and waters began to warm. The layers of teaming life represent represent the emergence of life in the early spring of our Earth. They also simulate the imagined experience of swimming through the water, as well as the artist’s own experience of focusing through the microscope, going from mud to discovering amazing lifeforms, to later viewing only bacteria as the freshwater plankton disappeared in the warmth of the laboratory. The work was begun during the "Art Kibbutz" artist residency.  The actual video micro-captures were done in the lab with small drops of water from the source. All imagery was found, digitized, and modified by Cynthia Beth Rubin.


 The water samples used in this video are from Camp Eden Village in Putnam Valley, New York. The work was begun during the "Art Kibbutz" artist residency. Music by Bob Gluck.  Vocals by Zoe Zak.




Sunday, March 17, 2013

Medieval Plankton and the Four Humors

Medieval Plankton and the Four Humors

Thanks to the Oxford Gallery of Rochester NY for inspiring this image.  Each year the gallery director, James Hall, comes up with a challenge for the gallery artists.  This year he challenged us to work with the theme of the Four Humors.

Because the idea of the Four Humors stems from early medicine, I turned to a Medieval Hebrew Manuscript as a source of inspiration, mixing the motifs of the era with my own captures of plankton. Of particular interest was the way in the plankton became to take on the character of the medieval decorative faces - the same lifelike haunting spirituality of the Middle Ages.
Bible by JOSHUA BAR ABRAHAM IBN GAON, Spain, 1310
Calendar of festivals  Bibliothèque Nationale ms Hebr. 21 Folio 4v








Sunday, January 20, 2013

Collecting Ceratium lineatum

Grouping the Plankton Portraits as long thin slices of moving life in an imagined water world. 

and an imagined installation


Sunday, November 11, 2012

Traces: Plankton on the Move


(link above is to low-res version - for High Definition click here)

In the spring of 2012, Elizabeth Harvey presented me with a flat gray video of moving plankton.
The challenge that I undertook was how to bring the movement of the plankton to a place where we could feel the magic of their existence. 

Through changing colors and adding tracks of their movement, I was able to bring a kind of spirituality to this most basic form of life.

Most plankton videos show them as frenetically moving about - but in this case because I added the traces of their movements they look like they are moving more slowly, as we can actually follow the trajectory of their movements.

Music by Jerry Fishenden, composed for this work, adds to the power of the plankton portrait.